#HitYourGoals Series: Grow your community on Twitter

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@fliocauv316,

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instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info

instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city. Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.

archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.

Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.

My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.

[via Design Taxi]

Even when you do something wrong, even when you fail, even when you make poor choices, you are loved. No doubt you will punish yourself enough for your mistakes. The question is: Will you try to do the right thing next time? Will you learn from your mistakes? Will you keep on loving and caring to the best of your ability?

I am not good enough.” A lot of us say this or a variation of this phrase, all the time. We don’t feel good enough for anyone or anything. I’ve recently been FEELING more and more inadequate as the days pass. I’ve always had low self esteem but I never really showed it or felt it. I kept it closed off in the box that is my heart. I can’t get around it, no matter how hard I try. People keep telling me that I am good enough. Telling me how pretty I am, how smart I am, how much I impact their life but…I just DON’T feel it or see it. I do try to believe it, but usually when someone tells me something like that I retort with a sarcastic remark or I flip it around and compliment them, taking the spotlight off of myself or I downplay myself as much as possible. It is not easy trying to raise ones self esteem, and that can be a scary thing. I think that I make things worse, not better. But, we must learn to get out of our own heads for we truly are our worst enemy and our toughest critics. So today, we’re going to work on self esteem, again. Self esteem goes hand in hand with mental illness. I want you to either comment with one thing that is GOOD about you, or you can say it aloud or both. One thing that is good about you, even if you don’t fully believe. It’s all about retraining the brain, and we must retrain ourselves to love ourselves. So, here I go: I am a good listener. I am good enough. I believe in you, I care about you. You are beautiful, you are wonderful, you are unique. YOU MATTER. It doesn’t hurt to hear that everyday. Tell that to yourself when you start feeling down. Be safe, take care of yourselves and remember you are never alone and you are truly and sincerely loved.