Make your business part of the conversation

Be heard it.twitter.com/e/er?utm_campaign=AQ_ED_SMB_EverydayMoments_EMEA_EN_140924&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua&s=1259914507&lid=6368&elq=635ad33b58914c7797316d27668fb6e9> | View email in browser

"Twitter for Business"

"Everyday Moments"

Hello@fliocauv316,

55% of Twitter users* Tweet about what they’re up to at that moment. They Tweet first thing in the morning, at lunch, on their commute to work and at home again, in front of the TV.

It’s a great opportunity for your business to join in with relevant conversations. Here’s a few ideas to get you started: *Establish when and where you want to reach people (e.g. on their commute or whilst watching TV)
*Use Twitter search to find relevant conversations and hashtags
*Join in by including relevant hashtags in your Tweets and replying to conversations of interest

Remember, people are talking about your industry or business right now on Twitter. Be a part of the conversation.

And if you want to increase your reach and be heard by even more potential customers then give Twitter Ads a try.

Try Twitter Ads

*Source Nielsen Twitter Consumer Survey, UK November 2013

Twitter | business.twitter.com | @TwitterUKI_SME | Tweet Planner | Unsubscribe


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Write Tweets that drive actions [Video]

Write Tweets that drive actions | View in browser

"Twitter for Business"

"Write Tweets that drive actions"

Hello@fliocauv316,

Did you know that 86% of people* who follow small to medium sized businesses on Twitter plan to regularly buy from them?

If you want to drive visitors to your website to get more sales then why not try out a website card? Simply select a clear call to action, choose an attention grabbing image and include a short description and there you have it - the best way to get your potential customers clicking on Twitter.

Log in to Twitter Ads today and choose a “Website clicks or conversions” campaign.

Drive more sales on Twitter

For more great ways to get people clicking on your Tweets watch our video

*Source: blog.twitter.com/2014/new-insights-on-how-followers-benefit-small-and-medium-sized-businesses

Twitter | business.twitter.com | @TwitterUKI_SME | Tweet Planner | Unsubscribe


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instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info
instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city.
Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.
Zoom Info

instagram:

Exploring “Ghost City” (город-призрак) in Seredinkovo, Russia

For more bizarre and beautiful photos from “Ghost City” in Seredinkovo, explore the Город Призрак location page.

Old taverns, abandoned docks and ghost ships are all part of “Ghost City” (город-призрак), a park located in the small town of Seredinkovo in the Russian countryside. The park premises were originally constructed as a Russian movie set in 2010, and were designed to look like an 18th-century European city. Now open to the public, the former film set allows visitors to explore the “city” and dress up in period costumes. With replicas of prisons, gallows, hotels, cemeteries, a fort and more, the park offers opportunities to capture time-worn landscapes for visitors and Instagrammers alike.

archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.

Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.

My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.

[via Design Taxi]